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7 Examples Of Japanese Etiquette Will Surely Drive You All Crazy!
7 Examples Of Japanese Etiquette Will Surely Drive You All Crazy!  
By suhas

Every country has its codes of ethics and etiquette and while the Eastern countries may blame the West for influencing their youth, seldom do hey realize that their own customs are quite...er..weird. Like Japan for instance.

ADDRESSING PEOPLE!
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For most of us calling people by names may be good enough, but not if you are Japanese. The Japanese respect each and every individual they meet and greet with adages like San(most popular meaning sir),
kun: Kun is generally used for a friend.
chan: It is primarily used for children, female family members, lovers, and close friends
sama: It is the most respectful version (lord or honourable). Earlier, it was used to refer to lords and deities but now, it is also used as a sarcasm.
senpai: for addressing one’s elder colleagues or schoolmates.
kōhai: the opposite of senpai.
sensei: for addressing teachers, doctors, scientists, politicians, and other authority figures.
shi: for formal writing.

EXCHANGING CARDS!
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As a country that takes its business very seriously, this probably is on its top priority etiquette. Procedure? Here goes:
Make sure you’re standing facing each other, now offer the card using your both hands. The next thing you need to pay more attention is, if your rank is lower than your partner’s, hold the card lower than they do. Once, you’ve got the card, put it on the cardholder and don’t immediately keep it inside, read it for a minute. And if you don’t have a cardholder, well, you may want to consider life!

RULES ON THE SUBWAY!
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When the Japanese enter a public place, there is no room for etiquette mistakes. First and foremost, talking is ABSOLUTELY NOT allowed, not even on the phone. And it is impolite to stare at others (like in most cultures). It is also NOT customary to give your seat to the elderly. They’ve reserved seats for them. There are special seats marked with a sign for them as well as for disabled people and pregnant women. These seats are not to be occupied if you don’t belong to these categories.

DRINKING ALL THE WAY!
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The Japanese are big drinkers and they love their alcohol. Sake may just be their all day brew, but hold on till you hear about their drinking related customs. The Japanese believe in what happens when drunk, stays in that very moment and will not ever be mentioned/brought up in conversations. They also dissolve all social hierarchies when they drink so students can chill with their teachers, boss with staff etc and how we see it, may even reveal their most embarrassing secrets when drunk but nothing would change the next day! We all need that Japanese friend now, don't we?

BOWING ANGLES DONE RIGHT!
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Bowing in most nations is considered a mark of respect for the one in front of you. Japanese children learn this art at the tender age because of its utmost importance. Japan has got different bowing styles that depend on many factors: standing, sitting, and female and male variants. Here are some of them:

♦The greeting bow (“eshaku“) of 15° is for people of equal business or social rank.
♦The respectful bow (”keirei“) of 30° is a bow for a teacher or a boss.
♦The deeply reverent bow (“saikeirei”) of 45° should be used if you apologize or see the emperor.
♦The ”begging for your life” bow is probably only used nowadays if you have done something really terrible.

MONEY WOES!
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The Japanese have a very weird attitude towards money. They’re often embarrassed to show it in public and hence, they use colourful envelopes while giving the money to someone. Of course, you don’t have to do this while shopping at supermarkets or elsewhere. There you can just drop it in the cash tray (where its meant to be) and not hand it over to the cashier, lest you offend the poor soul!

TOUCHING AND KISSING!
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The Japanese almost absolutely hate anything that the Americans love - touching and kissing included. If there are few things the Japanese love, top on the list would be personal space and NOT interfering in other's space!

Maybe that is why staring, holding gazes etc is considered a very bad practice - even for tourists!

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